Ysabel

(sometimes Faerie)

316 notes

shoreofmysoul:

When male reenactors try to claim that valkyries were not warriors, but only glorified chauffeurs and waitresses for einherjars, you can respond with:

  1. The name valkyrja means “chooser of the slain”: Valr (the fallen) and kjósa (to choose). They choose among the slain.
  2. They have names that denotes warriors like: war (Gunnr), battle (Hildr and Hlökk) and spear-fight (Geirahöð). [Völuspá and Grímnismál]
  3. They bear weapons, helmets, shields and armour - sometimes even blood-drenched: Then light shone from Logafell,and from that radiance there came bolts of lightning;wearing helmets at Himingvani [came the valkyries].Their byrnies were drenched in blood;and rays shone from their spears [Helgakviða Hundingsbana I], and the valkyries seated on horses, wearing armour and shields, leaning on spears in Hákonarmál.
  4. Valkyries sometimes descended into battle to protect kingsHelmeted valkyries came down from the sky—the noise of spears grew loud—they protected the prince;then said Sigrun—the wound-giving valkyries flew,the woman’s mount was feasting on the fodder of ravens [Helgakviða Hundingsbana I]*
  5. Odin cursed a valkyrie, Sigrdrifa, with eternal sleep because she had struck down the wrong king in battle. The curse was that she would never again fight victoriously and it condemned her to marriage. Sigrdrifa’s response was that she had sworn a great oath to never wed any man who knew fear. She is woken by the hero Sigurd and in return grants him great wisdom. [Sigrdrífumál]
  6. Valkyries decide how battles will turn out: They are sent by Odin to every battle, where they choose which men are to die and they determine who has victory [Prose Edda], in Njáls saga they weave the battle using entrails, and in Hákonarmál the valkyrie Skögul tells the fallen Hákon the battle turned against him thanks to them making his kinsmen flee.
  7. In Prose Edda valkyries are even poetic terms for battle.”Skögul’s din” means battlefield, “Gunnr’s fire” means sword, “Hildr’s sail” means shield, “Göndul’s crushing wind” means battle etc.
  8. The valkyries literally say that they’re going to battle: Start we swiftly with steeds unsaddled—hence to battle with brandished swords! [Njáls saga]

(*There’s a lot of cool stories about the valkyries: curses and love and reincarnation. Helgakviða Hundingsbana I tells the story of the valkyrie Sígrun who falls in love with Helgi despite her father having promised her to another man. She and the rest of the valkyries descend to protect Helgi while he wages war against her betrothed. In Helgakviða Hundingsbana II the couple dies, but are reincarnated as Helgi and a valkyrie again.)

(via punwitch)

2,311 notes

tzikeh:

prodigiousdeathray:

walkerflexxasranger:

kingjaffejoffer:

Buy: http://barbershopwindow.com/washington-caucasians-football.html
Sizes: Small to 5XL ($19.99)

i need this

Good start, but “Caucasians” is definitely not offensive enough.  Maybe the team could be the “White Devils” or “Pastyfaced Crybabies” or “Mayonnaise”

The word you’re looking for is “Crackers.” Man, white people will go to all kinds of lengths to get you to believe that “cracker” is just as offensive as actual racist language.

I like Wašíču, myself, because it feels like it has just the right tone to it.

tzikeh:

prodigiousdeathray:

walkerflexxasranger:

kingjaffejoffer:

Buy: http://barbershopwindow.com/washington-caucasians-football.html

Sizes: Small to 5XL ($19.99)

i need this

Good start, but “Caucasians” is definitely not offensive enough.  Maybe the team could be the “White Devils” or “Pastyfaced Crybabies” or “Mayonnaise”

The word you’re looking for is “Crackers.” Man, white people will go to all kinds of lengths to get you to believe that “cracker” is just as offensive as actual racist language.

I like Wašíču, myself, because it feels like it has just the right tone to it.

(via knitmeapony)

320 notes

Another Day, Another Mansplainer

jimhines:

ursulavernon:

jimhines:

A friend of mine posted something about catcalling and street harassment. To the absolute shock of … well, pretty much nobody, the very first comment on her post was a guy explaining why women shouldn’t be afraid of catcalling, and isn’t it funny how the women complaining aren’t the ones…

Hey, guys? Maybe you’re one of the GOOD ones. The NICE ones. The ones who are catcalling as a sincere compliment because you truly believe that’s the way women like to be addressed. (Oh, I’m sure you are. You are so special. And sensitive. You have the soul of a poet. It says so in your Tindr profile.)

Guess what? To borrow a phrase I heard…somewhere, can’t recall where…NOT ALL MEN are like that.

Many of them are raging assholes. Many of them are scary and insulting. Maybe, I dunno, you should deal with those guys. Because obviously by being scary and insulting, they are fucking up this precious beautiful catcalling thing that YOU do, which is totally emotionally healthy and leaves everyone feeling just marvelous about their day.

Yeah, you should definitely go work on that, Nice Man.

We’ll wait.

In which Ursula Vernon shows how she earned her black belts in Snark and Awesomeness.

31,183 notes

Imagine GLaDOS as a GPS though

the-chilz:

"Turn left. You monster."
“Oh, you missed your turn. That’s alright. It’s not like I gave you an advanced warning or anything. Oh wait. I did. Three of them.”
“Now I have to recalculate the entire route. Again. By myself.”
“Congratulations.  You’ve gotten us so lost even I don’t know where we are.” *slow clap*

(via nonbinaryanders)

129,504 notes

vegansanfrancishet:

So, I paint my nails pretty regularly these days. I also work as a barista/cashier pretty regularly these days. A few weeks back, I had a customer come in, a fairly typical, sheltered, suburban soccer mom, and she ordered a latte from me. She saw my brightly colored nails and said, “Wow, you’re so brave! My son asked me about painting his nails, and if it’s okay for boys to do that. Now I’ll tell him there’s a cool guy who does it too!” It was a nice moment, very cute.
Then, last week, she came in again, and said, “Hey, I’m so glad you’re here! I want you to meet someone!” She then brings her son forward, and says, “Okay sweetie, show him what you did!” And he throws his hands up, showing off his bright, sparkling blue nails. He shows them off, and I show mine off to him. He smiles. We fist bump.
Guys, I’ve only wanted to cry once at work before, and that was when someone ordered a large dry soy cappuccino on ice.
This time, though. This was a good cry.

vegansanfrancishet:

So, I paint my nails pretty regularly these days. I also work as a barista/cashier pretty regularly these days. A few weeks back, I had a customer come in, a fairly typical, sheltered, suburban soccer mom, and she ordered a latte from me. She saw my brightly colored nails and said, “Wow, you’re so brave! My son asked me about painting his nails, and if it’s okay for boys to do that. Now I’ll tell him there’s a cool guy who does it too!” It was a nice moment, very cute.

Then, last week, she came in again, and said, “Hey, I’m so glad you’re here! I want you to meet someone!” She then brings her son forward, and says, “Okay sweetie, show him what you did!” And he throws his hands up, showing off his bright, sparkling blue nails. He shows them off, and I show mine off to him. He smiles. We fist bump.

Guys, I’ve only wanted to cry once at work before, and that was when someone ordered a large dry soy cappuccino on ice.

This time, though. This was a good cry.

(Source: transtofuscramble, via naamahdarling)

19,613 notes

My mother once told me that trauma is like Lord of the Rings. You go through this crazy, life-altering thing that almost kills you (like say having to drop the one ring into Mount Doom), and that thing by definition cannot possibly be understood by someone who hasn’t gone through it. They can sympathize sure, but they’ll never really know, and more than likely they’ll expect you to move on from the thing fairly quickly. And they can’t be blamed, people are just like that, but that’s not how it works.

Some lucky people are like Sam. They can go straight home, get married, have a whole bunch of curly headed Hobbit babies and pick up their gardening right where they left off, content to forget the whole thing and live out their days in peace. Lots of people however, are like Frodo, and they don’t come home the same person they were when they left, and everything is more horrible and more hard then it ever was before. The old wounds sting and the ghost of the weight of the one ring still weighs heavy on their minds, and they don’t fit in at home anymore, so they get on boats go sailing away to the Undying West to look for the sort of peace that can only come from within. Frodos can’t cope, and most of us are Frodos when we start out.

But if we move past the urge to hide or lash out, my mother always told me, we can become Pippin and Merry. They never ignored what had happened to them, but they were malleable and receptive to change. They became civic leaders and great storytellers; they we able to turn all that fear and anger and grief into narratives that others could delight in and learn from, and they used the skills they had learned in battle to protect their homeland. They were fortified by what had happened to them, they wore it like armor and used it to their advantage.

It is our trauma that turns us into guardians, my mother told me, it is suffering that strengthens our skin and softens our hearts, and if we learn to live with the ghosts of what had been done to us, we just may be able to save others from the same fate.

S.T.Gibson (via sarahtaylorgibson)

(via seananmcguire)

2,965 notes

October “Toby” Daye was in many ways my first “real” protagonist. She was complicated, she was sad, she was bruised and refusing to break, and she was not afraid to put her duty ahead of her desire to be liked. She bullied her way through the world she was created to inhabit, looking at every complication that stood in her way and saying “No, you move.” After a lifetime spent moving dolls through stories, it was like I finally had a real person to follow and document. I started writing her adventures, and sending them out to people I trusted to read and review. Midway through either the second or the third book—I don’t remember anymore—I got a note from one of my proofers saying “You can’t have Toby do this, she’s always been a little bitchy, but this makes her a total bitch. No one will like her if she does this.”

I panicked. I couldn’t write a series about an unlikeable character! I’d never get published, no one else would ever meet my imaginary friends, and everything I’d worked for my whole life would be over, all because Toby was unlikeable.

Then I took a deep breath, and wrote back to the proofer requesting that they do a find/replace on the .doc, and plug in the name “Harry Dresden” for every instance of “October Daye.” They did, and lo and behold, what had been “bitchy” and “inappropriate” was suddenly “bold” and “assertive.” A male character in the same situation, with the same background, taking the same actions, was completely in the right, justified, and draped with glory. He was a hero. Toby? Toby was an unlikeable bitch.

The proofer withdrew the compliant. I have never forgotten it.

seanan_mcguire: Characters, criteria, and causation: where the problem lies. (via helavik)

(via seananmcguire)

229,314 notes

detrea:

The premise of minimum wage, when it was introduced, was that a single wage earner should be able to own a home and support a family.  That was what it was based on; a full time job, any job, should be able to accomplish this.

The fact people scoff at this idea if presented nowadays, as though the people that ring up your groceries or hand you your burgers don’t deserve the luxury of a home and a family, is disgusting.

(via seananmcguire)